Why is vitamin A important for babies?

Vitamin A is important for babies and young children, and some may not be getting enough. It’s needed for a healthy immune system, can help their vision in dim light, and keeps skin healthy.

Why is vitamin A important for infants?

In infants and children, vitamin A is essential to support rapid growth and to help combat infections.

When should I give my baby vitamin A?

Vitamin A supplementation reduces child morbidity and mortality and is recommended for infants and children 6–59 months when VAD is a public health problem. Vitamin A supplements given to children will not cause any significant side effects when the recommended age-specific vitamin A dose is administered.

Is vitamin A good for child?

In the alphabet soup of vitamins and minerals, a few stand out as critical for growing kids. Vitamin A promotes normal growth and development; tissue and bone repair; and healthy skin, eyes, and immune responses. Good sources include milk, cheese, eggs, and yellow-to-orange vegetables like carrots, yams, and squash.

What happens if baby doesn’t get vitamin A?

The most common symptom of vitamin A deficiency in young children and pregnant women is an eye condition called xerophthalmia. Xerophthalmia is the inability to see in low light, and it can lead to blindness if it isn’t treated.

Why is vitamin A harmful to babies?

Because vitamin A is stored in the body for long periods, women who take large amounts even during the months before becoming pregnant could place their babies at risk of malformations, the researchers suggested.

How much vitamin A should a baby take?

Infants 6 to 11 months of age should receive one 100,000 IU dose of vitamin A. Children 12 to 59 months of age should receive one 200,000 IU dose of vitamin A two times each year.

Does vitamin A have side effects?

When amounts greater than those recommended are taken, side effects can include irritability, sleepiness, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of consciousness, headache, vision problems, peeling skin, increased risk of pneumonia and diarrhea, and other problems.

What are the side effects of vitamin A?

Taking more than 10,000 mcg a day of oral vitamin A supplements long term can cause:

  • Bone thinning.
  • Liver damage.
  • Headache.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Nausea.
  • Skin irritation.
  • Pain in the joints and bone.
  • Birth defects.

WHO guidelines vitamin A?

In settings where vitamin A deficiency is a public health problem (prevalence of night blindness is 1% or higher in children 24–59 months of age or where the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (serum retinol 0.70 µmol/l or lower) is 20% or higher in infants and children 6–59 months of age), high-dose vitamin A …

How often can a child take vitamin A?

In settings where vitamin A deficiency is a public health problem, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a high-dose vitamin A supplement every six months for children 6–59 months to reduce child morbidity and mortality.

How do we get vitamin A?

You can also get vitamin A by including good sources of beta-carotene in your diet, as the body can convert this into retinol. The main food sources of beta-carotene are: yellow, red and green (leafy) vegetables, such as spinach, carrots, sweet potatoes and red peppers. yellow fruit, such as mango, papaya and apricots.

How do teens get vitamin A?

Good sources of vitamin A are milk, eggs, liver, fortified cereals, darkly colored orange or green vegetables (such as carrots, sweet potatoes, pumpkin, and kale), and orange fruits such as cantaloupe, apricots, peaches, papayas, and mangos. Teen guys need 900 micrograms of vitamin A each day.

Which disease is caused due to lack of vitamin A?

Night blindness is one of the first signs of vitamin A deficiency. In its more severe forms, vitamin A deficiency contributes to blindness by making the cornea very dry, thus damaging the retina and cornea.

What are the signs of vitamin A deficiency?

Symptoms of a Vitamin A Deficiency

  • Night blindness. This causes you to have trouble seeing in low light. …
  • Xerophthalmia. With this condition, the eyes may become very dry and crusted, which may damage the cornea and retina.
  • Infection. …
  • Bitot spots. …
  • Skin irritation. …
  • Keratomalacia. …
  • ‌Keratinisation. …
  • Stunted growth.

Is caused by deficiency of vitamin A?

(Retinol Deficiency)

Vitamin A deficiency can result from inadequate intake, fat malabsorption, or liver disorders. Deficiency impairs immunity and hematopoiesis and causes rashes and typical ocular effects (eg, xerophthalmia, night blindness). Diagnosis is based on typical ocular findings and low vitamin A levels.

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